Repeat after Me: I Like You. I Love You.

Digital illo from a graphite drawing: Love Letter #14Maybe it’s the approach of the fourteenth of February that does it, but I seem to hear relationship talk everywhere I go these days. Maybe it’s because the university (where my husband teaches, conducts, and works alongside singers and musicians of every level both as students and fellow College of Music employees) is in the midst of vetting and hiring a wave of new musicians and administrators to fill in the blanks as faculty and staff move to other positions or retire. Maybe it’s simply because I’m always attuned to what works and what doesn’t, as a person whose relationships shape my life in every way. Very nearly all of them for the better, thankfully!

In any event, whether St. Valentine is listening in or not, it strikes me that there are a huge number of three-little-word combinations that make relationships tick. Some, sadly, tick like bombs about to detonate. Those that tick along like a well-oiled machine tend to avoid the trios of words that begin and end with “I” and “you” but have negatives in the middle, even if that’s what the parties are feeling is most realistic at the moment. “I hate you” or any variant thereof has little hope of communicating anything other than that the speaker is not equipped to reason out of a problem, and whether that arises from sheer, stubborn, stupid self-centeredness or from lack of experience and skills, it would be wise for any of us to attempt to learn and use the necessary tools for genuine two-way communication. The risk of not doing so is far higher than the implosion of that one relationship, though surely that alone should be reason enough to try. Every being with whom we share oxygen in our finite little lives has the power to bring richness and beauty to our existence, or to crush our very ability to see and experience such things.

I know that’s a mighty far-reaching claim, but think about it: every successful interaction or failure on your part colors not only your mood of the moment or day but your ability to rise up on the next ready for joy or expecting disaster. You, in turn, reflect this attitude on those others around you, and while that poison or elixir-of-happiness is rippling away from you in concentric, if eccentric, rings, it is passed along in ever-increasing circles that will always find their way back in one sense or another. Some name this Karma, some Luck, some Destiny, and some, The Golden Rule. But if you can’t pull up your socks and look trouble in the eye and take pity on it with a rational yet heartfelt conversation or ten, you’ve not earned your right to complain about it.

Rational yet heartfelt, I say.

It does no one any good to have a weepy, foot-shuffling, embarrassed, or even joyfully conciliatory moment of rapprochement, no matter how deeply felt, if it isn’t given clear thought and the foundation for future prevention of recurrence. It certainly won’t fix any damage to plan it all out and chart the full course of the détente if it’s insincere or only marginally acceptable to one or more parties to the agreement. If your heart’s not in it, take the time to figure out why—preferably together—and fix the underlying problems before settling the current dustup.

An old but tried-and-true way of saying what one can’t seem to convey coherently in the heat of an argument or when just overwhelmed with emotions is to write everything you’re thinking and feeling down, set it aside for a short period (preferably overnight), and come back to review it. Clarify, edit, and make it say as honestly and fully as possible how you’re feeling and why you think that’s so. Consider whether your partner—at work, home, or play—would be able to understand your view of things better if that essay or letter were in front of him or her. Have you presented your thoughts as calmly and factually as possible, no matter how emotional the content? Did you state things with fair ownership, making sure that it’s transparent to anyone that these are your feelings and interpretations of the situation and that you take responsibility for them? Can you speak without assuming that all of the blame lies either outside or inside yourself, but realizing that perhaps both parties might need to concede a little in order to have a meeting of the minds? Do you admit that you might not even meet in the middle all of the time, sometimes needing to be the one who concedes more ground and others, being met more than halfway? Are you obsessed with being right or 100% satisfied, or can you allow that someone else with a wholly different feeling or goal might be equally entitled to those different emotions, tastes, or wishes? If you can add those recognitions to the ‘document’ before you, why not do it.

Then read again. Is this something that, if shared in humility and a genuine desire to find common ground, could become the basis for a kinder, more thoughtful and productive conversation? Maybe you’ll even want to share it with your counterpart, but unless you promise yourself never to do so as an attack on your partner’s integrity, personal sense of  worth, and human value, think first about how you’d feel on the receiving end. Isn’t that the point, anyway? To find a way to understand how your relations feel and what you’d want if you were in their shoes? If it isn’t, then I’d venture that it’s not a real relationship but the desire to make someone meet your needs and wishes. A person seen as a toy or tool for your convenience and pleasure is not a relationship, whether it’s pragmatic or romantic to you or, no, you’re actually absolutely lacking in empathy.

You probably wouldn’t even be reading this if that last were true. The only exception I can imagine is if you’re interested in developing empathy, or mimicking it, and frankly, either of those beats going without, in my estimation.

So what is the real goal in relationships? I would say that it’s mutual benefit. What are the possible benefits? Endless. In a work relationship—office, school, community, organization—it’s the ability to be more productive as a result of combining complementary skills and knowledge or merely by virtue of doubling or further increasing the work force. Yet more: it’s also the ability to grow and succeed in the business at hand because the combined companionship and efficiency of a strong, smoothly working team allows more creative and meaningful thinking as well as better energy for the moment.

In friendship and love, I tend to think the goals needn’t be all that different. If romance or lust is the only commonality, for a minuscule few that might be enough, but for most of us it’s a relatively small part of the daily equation. Temperate, even affectionate, converse is a fine place to start and end. If our words are considered for their impact on the recipients, the respect for their beliefs and feelings, needs and wishes, they will not only effect a positive response but can reinforce the alliance and mutual admiration. It doesn’t matter if the language if flowery and poetic, or if the thoughts seem original.

What matters is that you are willing to say, consistently and regularly, some positive form of “I _____ you” to your partner, with modesty, commitment, honesty, patience, and kindness. What does your partner want from you? Most likely, the same basic things you want from your partner: respect, liking, sympathy, empathy, care for one’s well-being. I like you. I admire your intelligence, your beauty inside and out, your accomplishments. I respect your ideas, your hopes and dreams. I am sorry for your sorrows, even the ones that I can’t fathom because they aren’t obviously situational. I recognize that your pain and joy are real, and that I am a part of them. I had my feelings hurt, but I forgive you, and I crave your forgiveness in return when I’ve been thoughtless or foolish, too. I want to protect you from whatever you fear. I hope that you will always be confident in my faith in our partnership and that what I do will show my desire to make your life better. I value your opinion and will ask for it when I’m contemplating a decision. It affects us both! If all of that isn’t crystal-clear, I hope that you will always feel welcome to tell me your needs and desires and to ask me about mine and respond positively to them. I love you.

And whenever you can summon the courage to do so, say it out loud. Trust me, if it’s true it never gets dull. I like you. I love you. I wish you well in all things. I am thankful that you and I are partners in this. Life is good, isn’t it.

22 thoughts on “Repeat after Me: I Like You. I Love You.

  1. A superb post. It’s so good to see you in fine fettle, as we say over here:) To find someone, be it friend, lover, long term partner, whatever – someone who we can relax with, relate to, laugh with, and feel oh so comfortable with….is a supreme joy….never to be underestimated. Have a beautiful ‘love day’ on the 14th…You friend Janet….xxxx

    • I am particularly astonished and delighted that I have some friends who truly meet all of those criteria you mention and yet whom I have never met IRL, thanks to blogging. You are absolutely one of the stars on that list of mine! Love on the 14th and always.
      Kathryn

    • Agreed! I consider the friends (real-world and online both) who meet my criteria an especial joy in this regard. I am grateful to count you among the genuinely treasured people I’ve gotten to meet here in Bloglandia!
      Warmest regards from cold Coolidge Corner at the moment! 😀
      Kathryn

        • You’re kidding! I didn’t remember that you’re in Boston. Silly me, I’d’ve checked to see whether I could meet you for a coffee or something if I’d known that ahead. Well, look out, ’cause next time I get to come to town I *will*. What a delightful surprise. We’re meeting with friends this afternoon/evening and flying back to ol’ Texas tomorrow, but I will keep in mind that there’s someone I’d love to sit down and visit with here when I get the next time to come to this wonderful city!

  2. Pingback: Repeat after Me: I Like You. I Love You. « buildingapoem

    • Thanks, my friend—I *hope* I’ve learned a thing or two along the way and will continue to do so! Happy to have so many great people like you around me in my blogging to teach me the further joys of happy and intelligent relationships with friends and colleagues!

    • Many thanks, dear John! Hope it’s been a lovely day for you. We did the super-romantic thing of flying in a crammed airplane between crammed airports—kind of unexpected, to me, that a holiday *plus* a Sunday morning would be so crowded! But it all went smoothly, and our favorite airport driver picked us up even though it was his birthday. 🙂 And brought us a yummy chocolate custard dessert. 😀 Arriving home is not *all* laundry and chores. 😉 Happy Valentine’s Day to you!!!
      xo
      Kath

  3. “Did you state things with fair ownership, making sure that it’s transparent to anyone that these are your feelings and interpretations of the situation and that you take responsibility for them?”

    We just don’t do enough of this. Seize the occasion (of irritation, anger) to lift the face of our response to examine what’s under (probably 30-yr-old skeletons!, STUFF that’s been smelling up the place even before Jane or Tom ticked us off).

    • Ain’t it the truth. I am still amazed every single time I get to the end of an argument with *any*one and realize that most of it had nothing to do with what we were ostensibly arguing about, and little of it was probably even connected to my partner-in-crying anyhow. So easy to get distracted by life and my own inner turmoil and insecurity into thinking things are more important than they are and that they’re always externally driven. Silly me. I keep trying to shape up, though. “Never give up, never surrender!” (I wouldn’t, of course, punctuate it the way that the Galaxy Quest script apparently does, but then that’s just creating another problem where there really wasn’t one, *isn’t* it!!!)

      Hope all’s well in your part of the universe, my darling D!
      xoxo,
      K

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